From the Dust

PURE LUCK (SOMEWHERE)

found Alaskan rock, Italian travertine & serpentine with Rosso Levanto, Giallo di Siena, Rosso Orobico Arabescato, Colordao Yule, Tennessee Imperial Black marbles, steel found object, deerhide, burnt wood

40”x 40”x 17”

This is about the Moirai — the Greek Fates — and their whims (luck).

Photographed at the 29th Annual Outdoor Sculpture Celebration in Lenoir, North Carolina this past weekend.  Some of the shots were taken early in the morning after a heavy dewfall the night before.

BALANCE FOR HORACE

Italian statuario marble, Georgia Regal black and Cherokee marbles, Georgia rough-sawn yellow pine

52” x 37” x 23”

An homage to fellow stone-carver and friend who passed away unexpectedly only a few days after I began the piece.

Photographed this past weekend at the 29th Annual Outdoor Sculpture Celebration in Lenoir, North Carolina.

APOLITICAL STATEMENT: 

HACKLES UP, BUT ON THE LEVEL

Indiana limestone, red cedar, antique iron hackle (ripple comb), brass & antique glass spirit vial from railroad level

38”x 73”x 18”

Photographed this past weekend at the 29th Annual Outdoor Sculpture Celebration in Lenoir, North Carolina.

Robert Winslow

Stone Fabric series

“As an artist, one cannot hide. The very act of expressing art causes a state of vulnerability, with rigorous self-honesty the necessity when creating.”

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

Robert Winslow

stone and optical glass series

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

These pieces are done by laminating glass and stone together, then carving and polishing the piece as a unit giving a transparent slice through - but also integral to - the form.  I have done something similar (with acrylic) and I know of a number of other artist/sculptors who have used this method for their work, but I have never seen anyone do it as well as Robert Winslow.  The River Piece at the top of this photoset is one of the strongest pieces to my eye, given the irregularities of the veining in the stone.  

What attracts so many of us in ‘The Dust’ (a term inclusive of stonecarvers) is the natural beauty of the stone when it is polished in all its pristine glory.  The polish shows the infinitesimal detail of the structure of the stone, and no two pieces are ever exactly the same.  

The glass laminated with the polished stone allows us - as viewers - to see into the heart of the form as if we had Superman’s X-Ray vision or something similar.   

Robert Winslow

stone forms from the Generative and Vessel series

"The only limitation an artist has is the knowledge of the medium. So if you’re willing to take your time to learn how to do stone carving or learn how to paint, the medium doesn’t matter as much as what you end up with."

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

Ilirian Shima

Albanian sculptor living in Athens, Greece.

His facebook page may be easier to navigate than the website … but it is worth looking at!

http://www.iliriansart.com/

Ilirian Shima

Albanian sculptor living in Athens, Greece.

His facebook page may be easier to navigate than the website … 

http://www.iliriansart.com/

VERDIGRIS DREAM: TWO NATURES
stretched primed canvas, plaster, ceramic, copper leaf, verdigris patina, crab claw, hardware-cloth, glass, paint
30”x 12½”x 4”

Slightly modified for it’s first exhibit …  
I have a habit of re-evaluating everything before they are entered into a public exhibit (and after it comes out of one).  The objective distance one gets from the public showing often make the deficiencies of design much more obvious to one’s perceptions. 

VERDIGRIS DREAM: TWO NATURES

stretched primed canvas, plaster, ceramic, copper leaf, verdigris patina, crab claw, hardware-cloth, glass, paint

30”x 12½”x 4”

Slightly modified for it’s first exhibit …  

I have a habit of re-evaluating everything before they are entered into a public exhibit (and after it comes out of one).  The objective distance one gets from the public showing often make the deficiencies of design much more obvious to one’s perceptions. 

title page and portions of the essay from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 1 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 1 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 2 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 2 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 3 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 3 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 4 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 4 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 5 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 5 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887