From the Dust

Robert Winslow

Stone Fabric series

“As an artist, one cannot hide. The very act of expressing art causes a state of vulnerability, with rigorous self-honesty the necessity when creating.”

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

Robert Winslow

stone and optical glass series

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

These pieces are done by laminating glass and stone together, then carving and polishing the piece as a unit giving a transparent slice through - but also integral to - the form.  I have done something similar (with acrylic) and I know of a number of other artist/sculptors who have used this method for their work, but I have never seen anyone do it as well as Robert Winslow.  The River Piece at the top of this photoset is one of the strongest pieces to my eye, given the irregularities of the veining in the stone.  

What attracts so many of us in ‘The Dust’ (a term inclusive of stonecarvers) is the natural beauty of the stone when it is polished in all its pristine glory.  The polish shows the infinitesimal detail of the structure of the stone, and no two pieces are ever exactly the same.  

The glass laminated with the polished stone allows us - as viewers - to see into the heart of the form as if we had Superman’s X-Ray vision or something similar.   

Robert Winslow

stone forms from the Generative and Vessel series

"The only limitation an artist has is the knowledge of the medium. So if you’re willing to take your time to learn how to do stone carving or learn how to paint, the medium doesn’t matter as much as what you end up with."

http://www.robertwinslowarts.com/

Ilirian Shima

Albanian sculptor living in Athens, Greece.

His facebook page may be easier to navigate than the website … but it is worth looking at!

http://www.iliriansart.com/

Ilirian Shima

Albanian sculptor living in Athens, Greece.

His facebook page may be easier to navigate than the website … 

http://www.iliriansart.com/

VERDIGRIS DREAM: TWO NATURES
stretched primed canvas, plaster, ceramic, copper leaf, verdigris patina, crab claw, hardware-cloth, glass, paint
30”x 12½”x 4”

Slightly modified for it’s first exhibit …  
I have a habit of re-evaluating everything before they are entered into a public exhibit (and after it comes out of one).  The objective distance one gets from the public showing often make the deficiencies of design much more obvious to one’s perceptions. 

VERDIGRIS DREAM: TWO NATURES

stretched primed canvas, plaster, ceramic, copper leaf, verdigris patina, crab claw, hardware-cloth, glass, paint

30”x 12½”x 4”

Slightly modified for it’s first exhibit …  

I have a habit of re-evaluating everything before they are entered into a public exhibit (and after it comes out of one).  The objective distance one gets from the public showing often make the deficiencies of design much more obvious to one’s perceptions. 

title page and portions of the essay from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 1 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 1 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 2 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 2 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 3 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 3 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 4 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 4 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 5 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 5 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Plate 6 from
A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments
illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper
with an introductory essay by
J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.
published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.
circa 1887

Plate 6 from

A Descriptive Handbook of Modern Watercolour Pigments

illustrated with seventy-two colour washes skilfully gradated by hand on Whatman drawing paper

with an introductory essay by

J. Scott Taylor, M.A. Camb.

published by Windsor & Newton, Ltd.

circa 1887

Fay Ballard

LEMON  and FLIPPER

graphite

On the ArtSlant art site I just read an interview with Fay Ballard, recently-turned artist daughter of SF novelist J.G. Ballard.  The occasion was a a current exhibit of her newest works which are graphite drawings of objects revisited whilst cleaning out her fathers house just before he died in 2009.

Many of these objects had been things she remembered as a child, and she says about them:

  “I wanted to interrogate the object with a pencil. A sharp pencil. A little bit like a scalpel. I didn’t want the colour to detract … from the seriousness of the subject. I wanted that austerity. Take the cookbook. If I’d given the dirty cover browns and yellow ochres I think it would have become too beautiful. Too decorative. I needed the plainness. The directness.”

The interviewer, Thogdin Ripley, then stated, “And where things have started to deteriorate, you’ve made drawing the dirt as important as the object itself.” Fay replied: “The dust which I draw—the dust on the flipper is a bit like fine lacework. And that’s what I draw, because I see beauty in that dust. It’s not dirty to me, or something to be ashamed of. It’s the accumulation of years and years of living—of a life lived. And therefore I suppose I’m trying to record it, but it’s more than recording. It’s more like commemorating it. And then I wonder, maybe the pictures are also tombstones, almost little monuments to my parents, monuments to my father, to my mother, where I’m carving out all these precious details. But the dust is the past. The dust equals the past of it. I mean I haven’t touched the dust on the lemon or the flipper… . The lemon is, I think, fourty-four years old! But what is the lemon? What is it really? I mean clearly it’s a lemon. But what else is it? What is it? It’s so much more… . And day to day—you can’t monitor that change. It’s over this grand period of time… and then it becomes timeless. I’m thinking it’s not frozen in time, it’s timeless. In a timeless zone. He [her father, J.G.Ballard] was doing what he said to me about the pyramids. He was beating time.”

This focuses on one very important aspect of what my sculpture is to me, the shadow of time.

http://www.artslant.com/lon/artists/rackroom/387625-fay-ballard?utm_source=06032014&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Eslant

 

DANAIDE 
Constantin Brancusi
cast bronze, limestone
1913
Tate Museum, London

DANAIDE 

Constantin Brancusi

cast bronze, limestone

1913

Tate Museum, London